Georgy

Psychometrician

Q: Where you are from?

Yerevan, the pink capital

Q: If you knew it was going to be your last meal, what would you eat?

Something I haven’t tried before, like fried crickets.

Q: What led you to pursue a career in your current field, and how has your professional journey evolved over time?

Back in middle school I decided to study the thought process, but after earning a Bachelor’s in psychology I figured it wasn’t math-y enough, so that’s how I became a psychometrician. I enjoy finding ways to apply complex statistical models to examine ordinary human experiences, and that’s what led me to be interested in game-based assessment.

Q: What motivates you to come to work every day, and how do you stay engaged and enthusiastic about your job?

I became a scientist to create something helpful to as many people as possible. Otherwise, will I even have existed? Plus it sounds cool in case someone asks what I do. So to sum up, my enthusiasm is fueled by moral obligation and vanity.

Q: Can you share a defining moment in your life or career that has shaped who you are as a person (rather than a worker)?

When I first found out about money, I asked my mom, “Are we rich?” She said, “We’re rich in spirit.” Not the worst capital to cultivate, and I try my best.

Q: How do you maintain a work-life balance, and what activities or hobbies do you enjoy outside of work?

I enjoy activities with low-intensity stimulation: painting, listening to string instruments, watching strands of fog rise off a nice pot of tea, or even writing a really good sentence. I don’t know why people are so opposed to watching paint dry, it can become a treasured experience. When I feel overwhelmed with work, I switch to something work-adjacent, but with less pressure, like writing a scientific paper.

Q: What do you hope the future of work looks like? (Please give an example of a challenge you see today, and what a solution might look like, or a specific thing you hope for in the future workplace)

As humanity becomes more numerous, I hope that work culture shifts to put more weight on the impact of our innovations. I would like us to spend the majority of work time modeling the long-term consequences of anything we create, before moving to action. As more of our labor becomes automated, maybe we should spend that freed up effort in foresight.

Q: What advice would you give to someone starting out in your field or looking to grow to their utmost potential?

Find out what burnout is, and then don’t burn out.

Q: Where you are from?

Yerevan, the pink capital

Q: If you knew it was going to be your last meal, what would you eat?

Something I haven’t tried before, like fried crickets.

Q: What led you to pursue a career in your current field, and how has your professional journey evolved over time?

Back in middle school I decided to study the thought process, but after earning a Bachelor’s in psychology I figured it wasn’t math-y enough, so that’s how I became a psychometrician. I enjoy finding ways to apply complex statistical models to examine ordinary human experiences, and that’s what led me to be interested in game-based assessment.

Q: What motivates you to come to work every day, and how do you stay engaged and enthusiastic about your job?

I became a scientist to create something helpful to as many people as possible. Otherwise, will I even have existed? Plus it sounds cool in case someone asks what I do. So to sum up, my enthusiasm is fueled by moral obligation and vanity.

Q: Can you share a defining moment in your life or career that has shaped who you are as a person (rather than a worker)?

When I first found out about money, I asked my mom, “Are we rich?” She said, “We’re rich in spirit.” Not the worst capital to cultivate, and I try my best.

Q: How do you maintain a work-life balance, and what activities or hobbies do you enjoy outside of work?

I enjoy activities with low-intensity stimulation: painting, listening to string instruments, watching strands of fog rise off a nice pot of tea, or even writing a really good sentence. I don’t know why people are so opposed to watching paint dry, it can become a treasured experience. When I feel overwhelmed with work, I switch to something work-adjacent, but with less pressure, like writing a scientific paper.

Q: What do you hope the future of work looks like? (Please give an example of a challenge you see today, and what a solution might look like, or a specific thing you hope for in the future workplace)

As humanity becomes more numerous, I hope that work culture shifts to put more weight on the impact of our innovations. I would like us to spend the majority of work time modeling the long-term consequences of anything we create, before moving to action. As more of our labor becomes automated, maybe we should spend that freed up effort in foresight.

Q: What advice would you give to someone starting out in your field or looking to grow to their utmost potential?

Find out what burnout is, and then don’t burn out.